whiteteethteens:

an open letter to t-swizzle -

i listen to your white girl bops, the musical equivalent of a vanilla bean frappuccino, to sob my eyes out about my first-world problems and fuckboys who crushed my heart, plus they give me a little bit more credibility when i call myself a “”“country fan”“”

i don’t want you to be a basic pop gorl! i ain’t here for your buffoonery to be put on top of dollar-general max martin beats, and i sure as hell ain’t here for you looking like a walking urban outfitters sale bin

i’m counting on you to serve me those heart-wrenching jams that got my ass sobbing on the floor at 3am when i’m wasted as fuck with this alberm and if you don’t imma be hella disappointed

Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies. Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies. Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies. Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies. Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies. Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies.
Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella series ‘Ghost Underground’  (Bless Soul / Soul Damned) : Inspired by the works of Rococo sculptor Antonio Corradini’s (1668-1752) veiled ladies.

(Source: vmagazine)

mermaidlion:

I see some kind of pattern here.

bellecosby:

hexgirl96:

Why do dirty hippies act like John Lennon was a saint

He physically abused both his wives, emotionally abused his son, was openly homophobic and antisemetic, was controlling and misogynist, he literally made yoko ono write a list of all the men she’d been with and shamed her for it, was openly racist, wrote a song called “woman is the n-word of the world” (except actually used the slur) and never actually did any activist work, just posed with whatever groups and signs were counter-culture for the media, stated that the idea of disabled people touching him made him sick, used to pretend to be intellectually disabled on stage as a joke, and probably tons more shit that was never documented

Stop worshipping john lennon. The Beatles are mediocre and he was a horrifying human being

Didn’t he also beat someone to the point where they later had complications that led to their death 

I remember on my 4th grade field trip my class was standing on a hill and my teacher said “lets roll out” and I was like oh ok so I stared rolling down the hill and I had to hold my teachers hand for the rest of the day

(Source: lenkagarnine)

ladyartanis:

queencersei:

originpallettown:

So you can’t like Cersei Lannister as a character because she’s an evil bitch, but it’s okay to love Loki and Walter White?

image

Album Art

The song recounts a specific sexual assault (“One of the most shattering experiences of my life,” Grimes, who was born in Vancouver as Claire Boucher, told SPIN in 2012) by describing the psychic fallout: “And never walk about after dark/ It’s my point of view/ Because someone could break your neck/ Coming up behind you always coming and you’d never have a clue,” she lisps in her high, pinched voice. It’s a dazzling, paralyzing performance, in part because Boucher sounds almost playful, and in part because the skronking behind her—the song’s springy, propulsive synth line was one of 2012’s most unforgettable—indicates something other than victimization. “See you on a dark night,” Boucher repeats. […] But what “Oblivion” ultimately offers is victory. It’s the sound of one woman turning personal devastation into not just a career-making single, but a lasting anthem of transformation.

Grimes’ Oblivion is the best song of the decade - so far.

(Source: ozhin)

Played 48986 times.

tamaratunie:

*suddenly hears rain really loud outside* let’s go back…….back to the beginning………………

lordsteeb:

imagine being an old-timey gangster but instead of having people murdered you had them loved. that’s pretty much my dream job now that i think about it. all sittin in bars in a pinstriped suit, being all “hey tony. see that guy over there? go take care of him, if you know what i mean.” and then tony goes and gives him a hug

(Source: orbsteeb)