(Source: wtf-albumcover)

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

kingofwesteros:

Publicity done right in an anti-rape campaign: double-page spread, pages glued to one another. After the reader forcefully separates them, the image above is revealed with the caption “if you have to use force, it’s rape”.

marrymepizza:

remember when I watched tv shows for fun and not because I was emotionally dependent with the fate of the characters

(Source: firstenchanters)

aminaabramovic:

avril lavigne’s new video got pulled off youtube im screaming even youtube is telling her to grow up

Album Art

So you got the looks but have you got the touch

(Source: supermodelgif)

Played 6985 times.
headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.
headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.
headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.
headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.
headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.

headcanonish:

mediumaevum:

This insanely gorgeous home has an amazing story behind it.

Fonthill was the home of the American archeologist and tile maker Henry Chapman Mercer, in Doylestown, Pennsylvania. Built between 1908 and 1912, it is an early example of poured-in-place concrete and features 44 rooms, over 200 windows, 18 fireplaces and 10 bathrooms. The interior was originally painted in pastel colors, but age and sunlight have all but eradicated any hint of the former hues. It contains much built-in furniture and is embellished with decorative tiles that Mercer made at the height of the Arts and Crafts movement. It is filled with an extensive collection of ceramics embedded in the concrete of the house, as well as other artifacts from his world travels, including cuneiform tablets discovered in Mesopotamia dating back to over 2300 BCE. The home also contains around 1,000 prints from Mercer’s extensive collection, as well as over six thousand books, almost all of which were annotated by Mercer himself.

More images (by Karl Graf)

While everyone is used to thinking of pureblooded families as being fantastically wealthy, like the Blacks and Malfoys, other families lived distinctly less affluent lives by the end of the twentieth century. Such homes as Blishwick Manor, though opulently built and furnished, had fallen into a certain shabby gentility even before Cantankerus Nott decided to sort them out into so-called better and worse society in his directory.

lezzieknope:

my hopes for season two of orange is the new black:

  • less piper
  • more everyone else

beynus:

lowkey screaming at Ariana Grande just shifting her look forward to the next decade in the past to make everyone be like YAS

"No one asked, at any point, if Mitt Romney might give up on his presidential ambitions because he wanted to spend more time with his litter of grandkids. Fuck, no one even asked in 2012 if Tagg Romney would do less on the campaign trail because he just got two new babies. No one asked because not only did no one care, but because everyone assumed that things would go on as normal because that’s what the fuck people do, men, women, grand or otherwise. The only reason anyone is talking about this is because Hillary Clinton has lady parts. And, no matter how you wanna sputter, “But…no,” it comes out sexist."